Latest Issue
ISSN : 2456-8643

Title:
EFFECTS OF (ficus sycomorus) BARK ON BODY WEIGHT, FEED INTAKE AND SELECTED INDICATORS OF LIVER TOXICITY IN BROILERS

Authors:
Martha Musukwa , Felix Haazele , Wilson Mwenya , Francisco Kanyinji , Pharaoh Sianangama , Joseph Simbaya , Ashley Chishiba

Abstract:
The aim of this study was to assess and compare the proximate composition of cultured Following the ban on the use of antibiotic growth promoters in poultry there has been increased research in plants having high bioactive compound content. Ficus sycomorus is an edible plant species that has been reported to contain tannins, flavonoids, saponins, steroids and alkaloids which make it a possible alternative to antibiotic growth promoters in broiler production. The incorporation of Ficus sycomorus bark in the feed of broilers could induce hepatotoxic stress because the bark contains tannins and alkaloids. Therefore, the effects of 2, 4, 6, and 8 g/kg of Ficus sycomorus bark powder (FSBP) in broiler feed on Body Weight, Feed Intake, Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity levels, Heterophil to Lymphocyte ratio, Serum Total Protein and serum Albumin of Cobb 500 broilers were investigated. The control had no bark added to the feed. The treatment diets were fed up to 42 days of age. After floor-brooding the birds were moved to experimental cages at 21 days of age. The cages were arranged in a Completely Randomised design with nine replicates for each treatment and experimental units having five birds each. There were no indications of liver toxicity effects from the dietary FSBP levels as ALT activity levels and Heterophil to Lymphocyte ratio were not significantly different (P>0.05) for all the FSBP levels. Serum Total Protein and serum Albumin at 36 and 43 days of age were positively correlated (P<0.05). The Body Weights at 22, 29, 36 and 43 days were positively correlated (P < 0.05) to the serum Total Protein and Albumin levels at 36 days indicating increased stimulation of protein synthesis for weight gain and further demonstrating that there were no hepatotoxic effects of the dietary bark levels.

PDF Download